Singapore Election 2011

Latest news and updates about Singapore's 14th GE

Singapore will not collapse if the opposition wins the next general election (revisited)

Posted by singaporege2011 on April 28, 2011

Temasek Review, January 2011

With public disaffection and disgruntlement against the PAP regime at an all-time high, the possibility of a “freak result” happening in the coming general election is becoming very real.

Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong once explained the thumping victories of the PAP in previous elections on the ground that the demographics of Singapore is similar in all constituencies.

In other words, the PAP can win big and lose big too.

Unlike the good old days where Singaporeans still remember the “accomplishments” of the PAP regime with gratitude, there is a palpable sense of disillusionment, unhappiness and anger on the ground.

With the stakes so high, the PAP regime will not take any chances in the next general election where its percentage of votes is expected to drop below the 66.6 percent it achieved in 2006.

We can expect PAP strongman Lee Kuan Yew to use his infamous fear-mongering tactics again to frighten Singaporeans from voting for the opposition.

He is likely to warn Singaporeans that Singapore will “collapse” and the foreign investors will be frightened away leading to a drop in their property values and salaries should the PAP regime be voted out of office.

Singapore will not collapse if the opposition wins the next election for the following reasons:

1. More educated professionals in the opposition:

In the 2006 general election, about 70 percent of the opposition candidates hold either a degree or diploma. The percentage is likely to be higher this year with more young educated professionals joining the ranks of the opposition.

Contrary to what is reported in the mainstream media, the opposition is not made up of a motley crowd of uneducated peasants. There are several high-fliers in the opposition who are of ministerial material.

For example, the Secretary-General of the Reform Party Mr Kenneth Jeyaretnam graduated from the prestigious Cambridge University with a honors degree in Economics and worked for several years as a hedge fund manager in London.

Another Reform Party CEC member Ms Hazel Poa is a former PSC scholar and high-ranking official in the Ministry of Education.

There are also lawyers, doctors, engineers, fund managers and other professionals from various opposition parties who will be contesting againt the PAP in the coming general election.

Unlike in the past, the gap between the PAP and the opposition is narrowing. The Singapore opposition has more than enough capable people in its rank to form the next government of Singapore.

We do not need all our ministers to be PhD holders. What we need are caring, empathetic and understanding leaders who know what is happening to the common man in the street.

2. Well-oiled civil service:

The ministers are only in charge of formulating policies and charting the future direction of the nation. The actual implementation of the policies is done by the civil servants.

Each ministry is helmed by a Permanent Secretary who remains in charge regardless of which party wins the elections. The role of the ministers have been overhyped by the PAP regime to justify their astronomical salaries.

In reality, ministers have to rely heavily on the bureaucrats under their charge to ensure that their plans and policies get implemented soundly on the ground with few glitchs.

The opposition can always count on our well-oiled civil service to govern the nation should it win power in the next general election.

Other first world countries like Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom and France experience frequent change in governments all the time, but their countries never collapse and their economies continue to grow as if nothing has happened.

3. MNCs will establish ties with new government:

The MNCs are only in Singapore to make money and they do not care who runs the country, be it the PAP or the opposition so long they continue to enjoy the same tax cuts and benefits to maximize their profits.

In the event the opposition forms the new government of Singapore, the top honchos of the MNCs will be queuing up at the Prime Minister’s Office to shake hands with the new Prime Minister.

The deep-seated irrational fear that an exodus of MNCs will happen should the PAP lose power one day is completely unfounded and baseless.

When the Malaysian opposition won the rich states of Penang and Selangor in the 2008 Malaysian election, the two states did not “collapse” overnight. No MNCs left the states citing lack of confidence in the new administration. In fact, both opposition-run states continue to attract foreign investments.

It is time for Singaporeans to shed their innate inhibition and vote for an alternative party to govern Singapore. We have nothing more to lose. Enough is enough.

Our beloved country has been changed beyond recognition under the charge of the PAP regime in the last few years. If we do not do something about it soon, we may never have the chance to do so.

The next general election may be the last window of opportunity for Singaporeans to reclaim ownership of Singapore after which they will surely be overwhelmed by the hordes of foreigners the PAP regime is mass-importing to perpetuate its political hegemony forever.

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9 Responses to “Singapore will not collapse if the opposition wins the next general election (revisited)”

  1. J. said

    Sounds fairly convincing… But what about Temasek Holdings? Isn’t it still a majority sharehold in almost all Singaporean companies? Including SMRT, Singtel, SIA, ST Engineering and other vital Singaporean companies? How can the opposition overcome this financial superpower if they wish to be able to govern Singapore without a gun pointed to their head at all times?

    • abu said

      opposition win, opposition take over temasek holdings, what is there a problem? PAP doesn’t own temasek holdings, singapore own temasek holdings.

  2. Jon said

    I’m pretty sure it won’t collapse, but I wouldn’t want the opposition to win a majority this time. Do bear in mind that they do propose changes and that they do seem capable, but they haven’t proven themselves yet.

    I would like to see them take up at least 40% of Parliament this time, enough to block changes to the constitution. They should spend this time learning the ropes and how to run a country, and once they have proven themselves, hopefully go on to win the next election.

    • Ah k said

      I agrees with Jon, if the oppositions win and overall, there will not be manufacturing, national reserves will depleted (look at US and many in-debt nations), and lost of foreign talents. Of course too many of these foreign talents may cos singaporeans to lost out, but it’s us that gotta fight back and gain ourselves as LOCAL TALENTS.. foreign workers, well, as many of us, are u going to work in constructions site, in labour intensive work, and in jobs that u need to work on weekends, if no.. U ask any garment in the world, I think there won’t be a solution.

  3. Philip said

    i would like to state that I do not support any particular party in particular, but I feel that there are many issues in which the opposition parties do not address at all.

    The opposition parties often point out the mistakes made by the current government, citing high housing prices, high GST, etc… however as a Singaporean, I would like to know how the opposition party plan to carry these out.

    GST and the government funds are spent on building housing, upgrading and many other development works, so if the housing prices were to be cut, how would the building costs and upgrades be funded by?

    Next, if the GST is to be cut from say 7% to 5%, the amount of money the government has to use would be lesser, combined with the fact that the people are paying less for houses.. wouldn’t this therefore lead to the government spending more than it actually has in order to support the people? Now, wouldn’t this impact Singapore’s economy as a whole, as such, instead of moving forward, it actually remains stagnant and eventually moves backwards in order to support Singaporeans needs?

    These are just various questions that many Singaporeans are asking and probably unsure if the opposition parties have actually thought it through before making their statements.

    I quote: “Other first world countries like Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom and France experience frequent change in governments all the time, but their countries never collapse and their economies continue to grow as if nothing has happened.”

    I would like to state that due to the economic crisis, technically almost all of europe (with serveral exceptions)is actually failing and about to go bust? Countries like New Zealand, United Kingdom and France.. their economies have not grown? In fact, they have massive budget cuts here and there in order to fight off inflation and to try and keep their economies aloof! Would the people of singapore like to wake up the next day and find out that their CPF money is being cut? That the free medical treatment at polyclinics for elderly has been scrapped due to budget cuts?
    So I believe that to say these countries have never collapsed is not the right thing to say, after all, it doesn’t mean that the country has not collapsed, to signify that the country is in serious trouble and its economy is barely surviving.

    I quote: “Each ministry is helmed by a Permanent Secretary who remains in charge regardless of which party wins the elections. The role of the ministers have been overhyped by the PAP regime to justify their astronomical salaries…Our beloved country has been changed beyond recognition under the charge of the PAP regime in the last few years. If we do not do something about it soon, we may never have the chance to do so.”

    Well, I would like to think that, currently Singapore as a whole, how many of us Singaporeans have taken for granted what we have right now? The fact that Singapore was not immediately and drastically affected by the economical crisis, is a sign that the government did do a good job, due to the ministers.

    So if the ministers are changed often after a new party has won the elections, wouldn’t this lead to many new regulations and rules replacing “old and inefficient” ones currently in place? Wouldn’t this therefore possibly destabilize Singapore as a whole, as it is possible the entire medical care system could be revamped? Or the housing system could be revamped? Wouldn’t this sudden change be quite shocking, possibly taking Singaporeans by surprise? After all, most of us are actually living rather well off and have been rather satified with the government services.

    So I believe that it isn’t a matter of the Needs which have not been answered and taken care of. I believe it is that the wants are the matters which have not all been answered. AFter all, take for example, there ARE sufficient MRT services and bus services, it is simply that we as humans WANT it to be more efficient by having MORE mrt trains and buses. However, all of these require an input of money, so if the government is to have more of these amendities, shouldn’t they raise the GST accordingly?

  4. Derecha said

    Why do they need time to ‘learn the ropes’?
    Back in 1955 did anyone spend any time ‘learning the ropes’?
    You do as you go along, learn on the job.

    • Jon said

      Do you think the opposition is ready to take on a majority? I certainly don’t, and neither do the opposition parties themselves. Sylvia Lim stated that it was their goal to hold 1/3 of Parliament so the PAP can’t change the constitution so readily (hence my figure of 40%).

      We do have to remember that the opposition parties are not one, they are separate distinct parties with their own manifestos. None of them are big enough to form a government; it would have to be some form of coalition government, which will result in much chaos between the parties. I’d rather them iron it all out while they hold the 40% of Parliament, and then move on as one voice.

  5. Yi said

    I do not hope the opposition will take over the gov at thi moment, for I believe that they aren’t ready to take over yet. However, I just hope that there would be a significant number of opposition candidates to block the constitution or at least provide an alternative voice in parliament. We need transparency in the system(how r our funds used,y are the ministerial salary such a bloatd amt etc) We need our needs to be answered, our opinions to be heard. We do not want policies thrown in our face and having to accept them without questioning the consequences of accepting the policies. Hopefully, the opposition will be there to fight for our real needs. Not use our pple’s money to do flowery upgrades etc.

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